Windows FAQ

Q:
The road behind our house has recently been widened to 4 lanes and the noise is horrible. Is there anything we can do with the windows to help?
A:
New windows with sealed glass units with argon gas and triple weather seals will go a long way to keeping the noise down. Specifying heavier 4mm or 6mm glass will also help as would upgrading to triple pane windows which would provide even more sound reduction.

Q:
We have just installed new windows, and for the first time there are droplets of condensation on the bottom of the glass on some of our upstairs windows. I thought new windows would prevent this problem.
A:
There are many possible explanations. If you replaced old sliding windows, they were probably allowing the moisture in the home to flow out due to air leakage. New window can be extremely air tight, trapping this moisture. Humidifiers and upstairs shows often inject a lot of moisture into the air which rises to the upper windows and often form condensation (particularly on the colder north facing windows). Opening window blinds and/or bedroom doors will increase circulation and turning down the humidifier and using bathroom exhaust fans will all help to alleviate this problem. Opening a window briefly to allow excess moisture to escape can also be beneficial.

Q:
What is the difference between 'BRICK to BRICK' and 'RETROFIT'?
A:
In a 'BRICK TO BRICK' installation, the entire window, including frames and interior trim are removed. This is the ideal installation, accounting for approximately 50% of the current market. With this installation, the window often comes with a fully installed jamb and an exterior brickmould. The cavity between the frame and the wall is foam insulated and a new casing trim installed. This complete job provides for the maximum window size and thorough insulation. In the 'RETROFIT' option, the window is installed directly into the existing frame and then sealed and trimmed on the inside. The exterior wood frame is capped in aluminum, providing a maintenance free finish. Done properly, this approach is acceptable and cost effective (saving approximately 30%). It is a useful approach when it is desirable to save the interior trim (such as in a century home), or exiting blind/window treatments that fit precisely in the inside frame.  

Q:
How do I know when it is time to replace my windows?
A:
There are many reasons to replace older windows. If your windows are single paned or have storms, or if they aluminum frames, they will not be very energy efficient. Old wood windows may be hard to impossible to paint and may have rot or mold. Outdated hardware may have broken down and is no longer replaceable. Old windows are difficult or dangerous to access for cleaning. The old windows do not suit the homes overall curb appeal.