Siding FAQ

Q:
I am replacing the old aluminum siding on my house and am wondering if it would make sense to add wall insulation at the same time?
A:
Adding insulation when residing may make sense, depending on the existing wall construction. Typically insulation can add 35-50% to the cost of a siding job. The payback for this in terms of energy savings might not justify the expense if the existing insulation is reasonable. Putting the extra money into upgrading replacement windows might provide greater energy savings. Often a new house wrap with taped joints is enough to eliminate uncomfortable drafts. If, on the other hand the walls are poorly insulated and the upper level of the house is noticeably cold, installing 1"-2" of a high density insulation board with R-6 to R-12 rating might be justified.

Q:
How do I know when it is time to replace my siding?
A:
  • Most older siding is steel or aluminum and colour is likely dated and faded
  • Dents and damage in old siding
  • Wood siding has become impractical to maintain
  • The walls are poorly insulated
  • Fasteners have worked loose and the wind has pushed the siding out

Q:
The trees around my home shed leaves and debris into my eavestrough on a regular basis. I hate climbing ladders. What is the best solution to this problem?
A:
There are many gutter protection systems on the market, most of which either don't work or interfere with the roof, making the shingles susceptible to damage. At Edmunds, we recommend 'Alurex Gutter Clean' system. Best when installed with new eavestrough, this product acts as a continuous hanger, keeping out debris and ice with added benefit of reinforcing the eavestrough, making it less susceptible to damage. Mounted directly on the eavestrough, this product is invisible from the ground and does not interfere with the roof shingles.

Q:
How do I know when it is time to replace my eavestrough?
A:
  • Old steel eavestrough has rusted and is impossible to repair
  • Nails keep working loose
  • Eaves have become distended and have lost their slope
  • Downpipes often become plugged